FAQ's

Early signs of Glaucoma

Glaucoma is an eye condition that gradually causes loss of peripheral vision. It is common for symptoms of glaucoma not to show up in the initial stages of the disease, and when symptoms do appear they may be so gradual they are hard to notice. It is important to have a full eye exam at least every two years, because damage caused by glaucoma cannot be reversed. However, if treatment begins promptly vision loss can be halted or postponed.

The most common form of glaucoma is called ‘open angle glaucoma’.  This occurs when the angle where the iris meets the cornea is wide enough but the eye’s drainage canals become clogged over time. This increases internal eye pressure and over time will cause damage to the optic nerve. We don’t feel the increase in pressure; it can only be detected by a specific test during an eye exam. Glaucoma seems to be associated with aging, and those with diabetes, cardiovascular disease or those who have immediate family members with glaucoma are at higher risk. Glaucoma in children is rare, but if your child is sensitive to light, has an eye that looks cloudy or if one eye looks larger than the other, be sure to have your eye care specialist conduct an exam.

A rare form of glaucoma is angle-closure glaucoma, which occurs when the drainage canals in the eye become blocked and intraocular pressure rises quickly. Symptoms include severe eye and head pain which may be accompanied by nausea, hazy or blurred vision, the appearance of rainbow-colored halos around lights, or sudden loss of vision. Angle-closure glaucoma is a medical emergency and must be treated immediately.

Glaucoma can be treated with good results if diagnosed early. If you are diagnosed with glaucoma, follow the recommendations and testing schedule advised by your eye care specialist. This will help you maintain good vision and the quality of life -- and independence -- that comes with it.

Macular Degeneration treatment and diagnosis

Glaucoma is an eye condition that gradually causes loss of peripheral vision. It is common for symptoms of glaucoma not to show up in the initial stages of the disease, and when symptoms do appear they may be so gradual they are hard to notice. It is important to have a full eye exam at least every two years, because damage caused by glaucoma cannot be reversed. However, if treatment begins promptly vision loss can be halted or postponed.

The most common form of glaucoma is called ‘open angle glaucoma’.  This occurs when the angle where the iris meets the cornea is wide enough but the eye’s drainage canals become clogged over time. This increases internal eye pressure and over time will cause damage to the optic nerve. We don’t feel the increase in pressure; it can only be detected by a specific test during an eye exam. Glaucoma seems to be associated with aging, and those with diabetes, cardiovascular disease or those who have immediate family members with glaucoma are at higher risk. Glaucoma in children is rare, but if your child is sensitive to light, has an eye that looks cloudy or if one eye looks larger than the other, be sure to have your eye care specialist conduct an exam.

A rare form of glaucoma is angle-closure glaucoma, which occurs when the drainage canals in the eye become blocked and intraocular pressure rises quickly. Symptoms include severe eye and head pain which may be accompanied by nausea, hazy or blurred vision, the appearance of rainbow-colored halos around lights, or sudden loss of vision. Angle-closure glaucoma is a medical emergency and must be treated immediately.

Glaucoma can be treated with good results if diagnosed early. If you are diagnosed with glaucoma, follow the recommendations and testing schedule advised by your eye care specialist. This will help you maintain good vision and the quality of life -- and independence -- that comes with it

7 Reasons to Have an Eye Exam

We’ve all heard the old saying ‘the eyes are the window to the soul’, but did you know that your eyes are also a ‘window’ into the state of your general health? A full eye exam not only keeps tabs on your eye health, but it can also detect signs of chronic disease such as diabetes or conditions like high cholesterol long before you notice any symptoms? Did you know that although certain changes in vision at mid-life are normal, others may indicate the onset of treatable disease? Read on to discover more compelling reasons why you and your family should have regular eye exams!

Did you know that…

  1. children as young as three may have vision problems that if not corrected can have negative impacts on their vision for the rest of their lives?
     
  2. children with undiagnosed vision problems may appear to have attention deficits, learning disabilities or a general disinterest in many activities, and thus have problems all through school that could have been avoided by an eye exam?
     
  3. common complaints such as headaches can be due to eyestrain as your eyes struggle to sharpen blurry images caused by astigmatism or unequal visual acuity in each eye?
     
  4. eye conditions such as macular degeneration or glaucoma can be detected by simple tests during an eye exam, and treatment started immediately to prevent or delay the onset of vision loss?  
     
  5. the loss of peripheral vision that results from glaucoma can be so gradual that you may not notice changes right away? This can make activities such as driving extremely hazardous!
     
  6. new prescription eyeglasses or contact lenses designed to meet your specific needs can easily address common changes in vision at mid-life?
     
  7. cataracts can cause decreased night vision and poorer vision in general, but they can be easily removed and your lenses replaced? This could help you retain your driving licence and enable you to continue driving safely for many more years.

Contact Lenses – Which Design is Best for You?

There are so many great contact lens designs in the market today that almost anyone can wear contacts. But for contact lenses to do their job properly and for your experience with contact lenses to be successful, it is vital that you have a full eye exam and consult with your optometrist.

First of all, your general health, eye health, vision requirements, lifestyle and expectations for your contact lenses need to be discussed. Do you need vision correction to safely drive a vehicle? Do you prefer to wear eyeglasses for work and contact lenses just for special occasions? Do you play a lot of athletic sports? Based on this profile, your optometrist can make recommendations as to what type of contact lens is the best fit for you.

These are some of the most common contact lens choices on the market today:

  • Soft lenses
  • Rigid gas permeable (RGP) hard lenses
  • Daily disposable lenses
  • Silicone extended wear disposable lenses
  • Bi-focal or multi-focal lenses
  • Toric lenses (to accommodate astigmatism)
  • Coloured/novelty effects lenses

 

Once you have made a decision on the type of lenses you wish to purchase, your optometrist will carefully measure your eyes and vision requirements to order lenses that are suitable for your needs and eyes. Be sure to follow care instructions precisely, and attend any follow up appointments with your optometrist to ensure a smooth transition to your new contacts.

If you do the research upfront in consultation with your optometrist, you will very likely enjoy success with your contact lenses. Just make sure to pay attention to the cleaning and storage procedures recommended for your lenses, and stay alert for any redness or unusual discharge from your eyes that could indicate infection. Return to your optometrist for your regular eye exams to ensure that your contacts are still the best ‘fit’ for you, and to keep your eyes healthy and your vision sharp!

 

What is Meibomian Gland Inflammation

Inflammation of the eyelid glands (meibomian glands) and “scaly eyelashes” (blepharitis) often occur together. They cause a chronic inflammation of the eyelids and irritable eyes.

Abnormal eyelid secretions are often associated with a low-grade infection of the meibomian glands with Staphylococcus bacteria. These bacteria live deep within the meibomian glands, making them difficult to permanently eradicate. Instead of the ±30 meibomian glands in each lid producing oily secretions to soothe the eyes, inflamed meibomian glands produce irritating secretions that cause red, uncomfortable eyes.
If this is combined with dry eyes, these irritating secretions cannot be washed away and a condition termed “Toxic Tear Syndrome” may result. 
 

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